List Your Business
 
 
     

How to Hire a Home Inspector.

The Real Estate Industry and smart homebuyers know the importance of a "Professional Home Inspection." Smart homebuyers want to know what the physical condition of their potential home purchase is. They want to avoid buying the proverbial "Money Pit."
 
The home’s location and visual appeal are what motivates buyers, and they may believe it appears to be in excellent condition. However, unknown, costly deficiencies often exist, which the buyer should know about before purchase. Therefore, they should hire a trained and qualified Home Inspector. The Inspector can detect any problems, and convey the true condition of the property in the form of a written report.
 
We suggest considering the following points to help you maximize the benefits of your next home purchase and that, "Home Inspector."
  1. Get a 5 to 10 day time period for the inspection written in the offer, purchase and sale agreement, giving you time to obtain a good inspection, and think about the report after you receive it.
  2. Choose a trained and qualified inspector. Many inspectors are trained Architects and Engineers, while some are trained by home inspection schools. Choosing takes time, and should be done in advance. Request a list from your reality agent, and search through friends for referrals. Good training is important.
  3. Points to look for first can be found in a sample of the inspector’s report. Is it presented in clearly written, easy-to-understand English? The report should include all of the independent parts of the house. Each part should be presented with findings and conclusions that are easy to understand. Any recommendations should be simple, and may often refer you to other professionals, specialists and technicians who are more qualified in a particular field.
  4. Does the inspector have formal training? The inspector could have been formally trained over a period of time in a classroom setting and in the field. Others have been trained through correspondence and self-help seminars including field training. Some have on-the-job training that is good, but can also be a false credential. To properly inspect and communicate, the individual should have some evidence they can do so. Having worked in related fields does not assure you of this ability.
  5. Call and interview the inspector. They should be easy to communicate with, and in a professional and businesslike manner. Mature and conscientious inspectors give you the feeling of genuine empathy and are sincerely interested in you getting the most for your money. You are paying for quality inspecting and communication, orally and in writing.
  6. Ask if the inspector will take you along on the inspection, and are they comfortable with your presence, at least for part of the time. The inspector should explain everything either during the inspection or afterwards. All of the inspector’s time should be yours for this part.
  7. Inspection experience is important, and so is other work in related fields, but the most important points are communication, and the care taken in preparing a written report, either fully narrative or partially through the use of a preprinted form. On-site reports are adequate for many home inspections, but full narrative reports for more detailed reviews are best for a clear understanding and explanations with recommendations. The inspection report is better prepared within 24 hours of midnight of the day of the inspection, if a full narrative is what you purchased. The report is the ‘product’ you are paying for. So, get one which is carefully written and easy-to-understand, either using a form or a full narrative style of report.
  8. Shopping by price is usually a disaster. Search for the most qualified inspector you feel most comfortable with, and pay the requested price. This is probably the most important and largest purchase of your life. Do not blow it using less than the best because of price. Good inspectors know what they are worth and so should you.
  9. Meet the inspector at the house, and take a note pad. Do not worry, everything you discuss and take a note about (and more) will be seen in the report. The notes will help you think in advance about work orders you may include in the purchase.
  10. Membership in an association is a good point, but not any assurance of the quality of the inspector or their inspection. None of the associations have a disciplinary board to police their members. Some have entry training requirements, but this does not guarantee you of the quality of services. However, most of the associations require their members to follow their Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics. Otherwise they are not allowed to be members of the association. You should be able to get a copy of these before the inspection. Just remember that all of the titles and memberships have merit, but nothing to do with the ability to communicate, and the integrity of the home inspector. Did you like reading the sample report? Do you like the inspector? Does the conversation seem businesslike and professional? Are you comfortable?
*Information above provided by startremodeling.com

This content was sponsored by:

Innovative Home Inspection, llc
47922 royal point dr.
Canton, MI 48187
Turtle Roofing
8404 Sterling St #1
Irving, TX 75063
Crescent Movers
6321 N. Cicero Ave, Unit A
Chicago, IL 60646
Professional Fire Service, Inc.
151-21 West Industry Ct
Deer Park, NY 11729
ABET LLC
PO BOX 2302 Sugar Land, TX, 77479 USA
http://www.abethouston.com/
Sugarland, TX 77479
Home Inspection All Star Houston
2401 Main St
Houston, TX 77002
Better Inspector
6893 Vantage Court
Florence, KY 41042
Johnson Construction Company LLC
1707 N West St.
Lima, OH 45801
Drytech Restoration Services
80 Central Ave.
Spring City, PA 19475
Coastal Home Inspectors
6478 Plumosa Ave, Fort Myers, FL 33908, USA
Forth Myers, FL 33901
Day &Nite Doors, Inc.
370 E. Orangethorpe Ave.
Placentia, CA 92870
KM Home Inspection
7569 S Monaco Way
Centennial, CO 80112
 

In your area: